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Ivory Coast Must Overhaul Key Cocoa Sector, Says World Bank

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Ivory Coast, the world ’s largest cocoa producer, earns just a fraction of the crop’ s potential value and must process it domestically and develop its distribution to fully reap the benefits , a World Bank report said Thursday .

Cocoa accounts for 40 percent of the West African nation’ s exports but the country only earns about eight percent of total profits in the cocoa-chocolate sector, bank economist Jacques Morisset told AFP.

“ Despite its importance to the Ivorian economy and society, the cocoa sector is not playing its role as the engine of economic development, ” said his 61 -page report, entitled “ Cacaoland: How to Transform Cote d ’ Ivoire” .

“ Some even go so far as to cite the curse of ‘ brown gold’, ” the World Bank added, because 55 percent of cocoa producers live on about 757 CFA francs ( $1 .3 / 1 .15 euros) a day, which is below the poverty line.

“ Most of the sector’ s profit ( almost 80 percent) is concentrated in the second phase of processing (chocolate paste ) and in the distribution phase of finished products to consumers , two phases in which Ivory Coast does not yet play a major role ,” said the report.

Meanwhile, the expansion of cultivated land in recent decades has destroyed Ivory Coast’ s forest cover , which is now less than three million heactares ( 7. 4 million acres ) , from 12 million hectares in 1960 .

Morisset called for “a better distribution of added value earnings among Ivorians working in the sector,” via reforms of taxes and other levies imposed on cocoa producers .

In industrialised nations , consumers are scrutinising the product’ s origins owing to studies on the environmental and social costs of cocoa plantations , from felled forests to child labour .

“ It is becoming increasingly difficult to sell uncertified cocoa , producer countries ( including Ivory Coast) and multinationals along the value chain must change their behaviours by adopting codes of conduct and establishing partnership frameworks, ” the report said.

“ Countries such as Germany have already banned the sale of uncertified chocolate , a move that is expected to gain traction in years ahead. ”

Germany is the world’ s largest exporter of chocolate products .

Condition for survival
Climate change is also taking a toll in Ivory Coast where land is becoming parched and less fertile, while a third of the existing cocoa plants are getting old and vulnerable to disease .

The report recommends replacing them, with a shift from extensive to intensive growth.

“ This is not an option , it’ s a condition for survival ,” said Morisset , calling for “ a green revolution that will bring about a radical increase in yield for cocoa growers, compared with the 500 kilos/ hectare (446 pounds/ acre ) of the past 20 years .”

Overall, Ivory Coast produces two million tonnes of cocoa per year, grown by about a million producers who provide a meagre income for five million people — about a fifth of the population .

Cocoa beans are the leading source of foreign currency earnings, but less than a quarter of the crop is processed domestically .

In 2018 , Ivory Coast and neighbouring Ghana – which together account for 65 percent of global production – created a joint sales mechanism .

They fixed a minimum price of $ 2, 600 dollars a tonne to benefit farmers who only received a total of six billion dollars from a global market worth about $100 billion.

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[ @dongreat: ] Ivory Coast, the world ’s largest cocoa producer, earns just a fraction of the crop’ s potential value and must process it domestically and develop its distribution to fully reap the benefits , a World Bank report said Thursday .

Cocoa accounts for 40 percent of the West African nation’ s exports but the country only earns about eight percent of total profits in the cocoa-chocolate sector, bank economist Jacques Morisset told AFP.

“ Despite its importance to the Ivorian economy and society, the cocoa sector is not playing its role as the engine of economic development, ” said his 61 -page report, entitled “ Cacaoland: How to Transform Cote d ’ Ivoire” .

“ Some even go so far as to cite the curse of ‘ brown gold’, ” the World Bank added, because 55 percent of cocoa producers live on about 757 CFA francs ( $1 .3 / 1 .15 euros) a day, which is below the poverty line.

“ Most of the sector’ s profit ( almost 80 percent) is concentrated in the second phase of processing (chocolate paste ) and in the distribution phase of finished products to consumers , two phases in which Ivory Coast does not yet play a major role ,” said the report.

Meanwhile, the expansion of cultivated land in recent decades has destroyed Ivory Coast’ s forest cover , which is now less than three million heactares ( 7. 4 million acres ) , from 12 million hectares in 1960 .

Morisset called for “a better distribution of added value earnings among Ivorians working in the sector,” via reforms of taxes and other levies imposed on cocoa producers .

In industrialised nations , consumers are scrutinising the product’ s origins owing to studies on the environmental and social costs of cocoa plantations , from felled forests to child labour .

“ It is becoming increasingly difficult to sell uncertified cocoa , producer countries ( including Ivory Coast) and multinationals along the value chain must change their behaviours by adopting codes of conduct and establishing partnership frameworks, ” the report said.

“ Countries such as Germany have already banned the sale of uncertified chocolate , a move that is expected to gain traction in years ahead. ”

Germany is the world’ s largest exporter of chocolate products .

Condition for survival
Climate change is also taking a toll in Ivory Coast where land is becoming parched and less fertile, while a third of the existing cocoa plants are getting old and vulnerable to disease .

The report recommends replacing them, with a shift from extensive to intensive growth.

“ This is not an option , it’ s a condition for survival ,” said Morisset , calling for “ a green revolution that will bring about a radical increase in yield for cocoa growers, compared with the 500 kilos/ hectare (446 pounds/ acre ) of the past 20 years .”

Overall, Ivory Coast produces two million tonnes of cocoa per year, grown by about a million producers who provide a meagre income for five million people — about a fifth of the population .

Cocoa beans are the leading source of foreign currency earnings, but less than a quarter of the crop is processed domestically .

In 2018 , Ivory Coast and neighbouring Ghana – which together account for 65 percent of global production – created a joint sales mechanism .

They fixed a minimum price of $ 2, 600 dollars a tonne to benefit farmers who only received a total of six billion dollars from a global market worth about $100 billion.

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[ @dongreat: ] Ivory Coast, the world ’s largest cocoa producer, earns just a fraction of the crop’ s potential value and must process it domestically and develop its distribution to fully reap the benefits , a World Bank report said Thursday .

Cocoa accounts for 40 percent of the West African nation’ s exports but the country only earns about eight percent of total profits in the cocoa-chocolate sector, bank economist Jacques Morisset told AFP.

“ Despite its importance to the Ivorian economy and society, the cocoa sector is not playing its role as the engine of economic development, ” said his 61 -page report, entitled “ Cacaoland: How to Transform Cote d ’ Ivoire” .

“ Some even go so far as to cite the curse of ‘ brown gold’, ” the World Bank added, because 55 percent of cocoa producers live on about 757 CFA francs ( $1 .3 / 1 .15 euros) a day, which is below the poverty line.

“ Most of the sector’ s profit ( almost 80 percent) is concentrated in the second phase of processing (chocolate paste ) and in the distribution phase of finished products to consumers , two phases in which Ivory Coast does not yet play a major role ,” said the report.

Meanwhile, the expansion of cultivated land in recent decades has destroyed Ivory Coast’ s forest cover , which is now less than three million heactares ( 7. 4 million acres ) , from 12 million hectares in 1960 .

Morisset called for “a better distribution of added value earnings among Ivorians working in the sector,” via reforms of taxes and other levies imposed on cocoa producers .

In industrialised nations , consumers are scrutinising the product’ s origins owing to studies on the environmental and social costs of cocoa plantations , from felled forests to child labour .

“ It is becoming increasingly difficult to sell uncertified cocoa , producer countries ( including Ivory Coast) and multinationals along the value chain must change their behaviours by adopting codes of conduct and establishing partnership frameworks, ” the report said.

“ Countries such as Germany have already banned the sale of uncertified chocolate , a move that is expected to gain traction in years ahead. ”

Germany is the world’ s largest exporter of chocolate products .

Condition for survival
Climate change is also taking a toll in Ivory Coast where land is becoming parched and less fertile, while a third of the existing cocoa plants are getting old and vulnerable to disease .

The report recommends replacing them, with a shift from extensive to intensive growth.

“ This is not an option , it’ s a condition for survival ,” said Morisset , calling for “ a green revolution that will bring about a radical increase in yield for cocoa growers, compared with the 500 kilos/ hectare (446 pounds/ acre ) of the past 20 years .”

Overall, Ivory Coast produces two million tonnes of cocoa per year, grown by about a million producers who provide a meagre income for five million people — about a fifth of the population .

Cocoa beans are the leading source of foreign currency earnings, but less than a quarter of the crop is processed domestically .

In 2018 , Ivory Coast and neighbouring Ghana – which together account for 65 percent of global production – created a joint sales mechanism .

They fixed a minimum price of $ 2, 600 dollars a tonne to benefit farmers who only received a total of six billion dollars from a global market worth about $100 billion.

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thats really good to know

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